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North Yorkshire Road cameras and weather conditions

North Yorkshire Road cameras and weather conditions Weather stations are placed across the county and monitor humidity, road temperature, air temperature, and wind speed. Some stations have cameras on them, allowing you to see what road conditions are like.

Weather station cameras

The pictures are updated every ten minutes, 24 hours a day.

Click Here to Find North Yorkshire Road & Weather Conditions

North Yorkshire Road cameras and weather conditions Please make sure that you check the date and time of the camera you are viewing before making a decision about your journey. The remote location of some cameras means that from time to time, sometimes due to mobile network conditions, the pictures can become out of date.

Weather stations are placed across the county and monitor humidity, road temperature, air temperature and wind speed. Some stations have cameras on them, allowing you to see what road conditions are like.

Weather station cameras

The pictures are updated every ten minutes, 24 hours a day.

To update the pictures, you will need to reload this page to view the latest versions.

Update camera images

Please make sure that you check the date and time of the camera you are viewing before making a decision about your journey. The remote location of some cameras means that from time to time, sometimes due to mobile network conditions, the pictures can become out of date.

Click Here to check local Travel Updates

Cold conditions sweep across UK 3oth November 2023
There will be widespread overnight frosts for much of the UK in the coming days and a risk of snow for some regions.

Much colder conditions are expected to affect the UK for the rest of this week and into the weekend, with daytime temperatures rooted in single figures and overnight temperatures falling well below freezing in many places.

With the UK sitting in cold air from Scandinavia the weather is turning much colder for the rest of this week and the start of next with daytime temperatures struggling to get above single figures and overnight temperatures staying below freezing for much of the country.

Met Office Chief Meteorologist, Neil Armstrong, said: “We’ve already seen snow settling in parts of eastern Scotland and northeastern England. As the cold air continues to spread across the UK we also expect to see some snow over the high ground of southwest England overnight tonight and through tomorrow.

“Snow showers will continue along the North Sea coast with a northeasterly air flow, leading to further accumulations over higher ground. Where the showers fall as rain there is a risk of icy patches forming overnight with temperatures widely dipping below freezing. A number of National Severe Weather Warnings have been issued and these are likely to be updated through the week so stay up to date with the forecast for your area.”

Map of the UK showing chances of snow and ice through Wednesday night and Thursday. For the western half of Northern Ireland wintry showers may lead to icy patches forming on untreated surfaces. In southwest England spells of snow may develop over hills, especially parts of Bodmin Moor, Dartmoor, Blackdown Hills and Exmoor during the early hours of Thursday before petering out later in the day. The highest parts of Dartmoor and perhaps Bodmin Moor may see 5-10cm of snow with some drifting in strong easterly winds. Elsewhere, accumulations are likely to be relatively small, perhaps 1-3cm at most, and mainly in areas inland and above 100-200m. In addition to this, icy patches may also develop on untreated surfaces. In the northeast of the UK wintry showers will continue to affect northern and eastern parts of Scotland and northeast England during Wednesday evening, overnight and into Thursday morning. These are likely to fall onto frozen surfaces allowing icy patches to form. Additionally, showers will fall as snow inland, with up to 2cm possible in places, perhaps as much as 5 cm over high ground.Snow has been settling in northeastern parts of the UK, with 5cm overnight at Fylingdales in the North York Moors, 2cm at Aviemore and 1 cm at Albemarle and Bingley.

Remaining cold next week
The cold regime looks likely to continue into next week, with a good deal of dry sunny weather for many. However, showers remain possible, particularly in eastern coastal areas, and these could be wintry at times.

The UKHSA has issued yellow and amber cold-health alerts for the health sector covering northern regions of England through until the 5th of December.

Prepare for the cold
RAC Breakdown spokesman Rod Dennis said: “We expect to see a sharp rise in breakdowns this week as cold weather is the nemesis of older car batteries. It exposes any weaknesses in battery health and leads to a huge jump in the number of cars that won’t start.

“We urge every driver who has noticed their car is sluggish to start to get it checked by a reputable mobile mechanic or garage as soon as possible. Anyone who doesn’t risks their car letting them down just at the very moment they need it, whether they’re heading to work or on the way to an important appointment.

“We also strongly recommend drivers pack some winter gear should their cars let them down and they find themselves stuck in sub-zero temperatures. Extra warm clothes, food and drink, plus a fully charged phone power bank are all a must.”

Snowfall in late autumn or early winter doesn’t generally linger because ground temperatures broadly remain relatively high, especially compared with values in late winter, after the ground loses more of its warmth.

You can keep up to date with the latest forecast on our website, by following us on Twitter and Facebook, as well as on our mobile app which is available for iPhone from the App Store and for Android from the Google Play Store.
See regular updates from harrogateguideuk.co.uk which shows over 3500 Businesses & Services in and around Harrogate If you find our site useful, please support us by liking or following us. Email me ian.barlow@harrogateuk.co.uk

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